Media Coverage



In this article, a Bay News 9 commentator shows how a Tampa Bay shrimper uses a dip net and a low powered light to shrimp the grass flats in Pinellas County. The story is interesting because it shows the exact conditions that exist out on the grass flats and the basic idea behind shrimping at night in the grass flats. Some of the more interesting highlights:

1.) Note how the commentator and shrimper argue about "who scared the shrimp." In reality, the shrimp hasn't gone anywhere. When the shrimper shined the brighter light on the shrimp, it became invisible to both of them because the light was no longer reflecting back from the shrimp's eyes; it was being masked by the other shrimper's light.It is just a few feet from the shrimper. He would be able to see this if he had a better light.

2.) Also note how painful and inefficient this looks. Bending over with a dip net - ouch! The shrimp can escape at any time and the net certainly disturbs all the grass around it, as much as they try not to mess it up. Imagine all the muck you have to pull out of the net to find the shrimp! The only benefit going for a dip net is that it is extremely cheap. Still, imagine how quickly that will wear out!

3.) The funniest part is when the commentator highlights the number of shrimp possible in a single night using a dip net: 3-4 dozen. People using dip nets will rarely catch more than 15 dozen in a night even during the best times of the year. This is far from five gallons.

4.) If you plan on shrimping, don't follow the advice of the commentator regarding the season. It actually lasts longer than he described. The prime shrimping season for this area is late March through the first days of July. Any earlier and you don't get any shrimp. If you call it quits too early, you miss some of the best shrimping in the region.


0
Shares