Shrimping Tools



One of the keys to shrimping is being able to identify the correct conditions for shrimping. Regardless of which method you use, the most important condition is always the tide. The tide determines if you can get your boat to the spot where the shrimp are or, if you can walk there. It also determines whether the shrimp are even going to be where you want to go. The tide can also determine whether or not it is even safe to be there.

This article will give you an idea of how shrimp live and why they come to our areas each year. It will also help explain why there are only a few shrimp one week and buckets full the next.

Each year Ozello Shrimper reviews the list of tide chart software out there and puts together a list of good sites.  The top three are usually the best of the breed.  We aren't saying that we are the definitive list but if we use a tide chart predictor you can be fairly sure that it works.  So, check out the lists of tide charts we have assembled and see if your method is in need of a tune up.  If you see another tide chart that should be included, please feel free to add it to our shrimpers forum or e-mail us directly at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to have it included.

In this article, we lay out the case for why you should be using an Ozello Shrimper instead of any alternative method of shrimping.  We do this by explaining how to use an Ozello Shrimper and provide a comparison of the Ozello Shrimper with the competing methods.  It is our hope that after reading this, you'll join us! 

Many people believe stingray's to be harmless because of the increase in "pet the stingray" pools in zoos and are attracted to them by their pretty colors and strange shapes. When they are not threatened, a stingray is virtually harmless but, when in danger, a stingray can be quite dangerous.

This new Google Earth Overlay provides all public Florida boat ramps, information about any applicable fees, photos where possible and directions to the location. It was put together with cooperation from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. We used their source file to generate the map below. You will need to zoom into your area or region to click the items because there are just so many of them.

Mississippi generally catches the same shrimp that we do, just a different variant. This data published by the State of Mississippi might be useful to those of us from the Northern part of Florida.

For those of us who go out and catch our fill, we know that the fun usually ends when it comes time to clean those little suckers. Sure, there is something satisfying about picking through each shrimp you caught one by one and showing them off to your fellow shrimpers but when you shrimp every night and catch upwards of three to five gallons of shrimp an evening, it can mean a lot of work, and mess.

Sometimes you just want to know if the water is cold. Other times you want to know if it has red tide. Here are some sites to help you!

Three PDF resources outlining the different method of shrimping recreationally and how to do it yourself. Based around the state and country, these articles are quick reading and quite interesting.

When shrimping, you will always run into other shrimpers. If you go shrimping on the weekend, this will be especially so. Shrimping is so much fun and so productive that there can be nights where you are accompanied by 50 or more shrimpers on the same grass flats. To help make your shrimping and the shrimping of fellow shrimpers more enjoyable, follow these simple rules.

We love scientific reports on shrimp here at Ozello Shrimper. They give us insight into where, when and why shrimp move through the area and help us more accurately target our favorite meals. This scientific report, published in 1965 is no different. It examines bait shrimp (read: shrimp) in the Tampa Bay area and shows where they come from and where they live.

The following report was created by the United States Department of the Interior in 1968 by Carl Saloman, a Fisheries Biologist at the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory in St. Petersburg, Florida after a 17 month long research program into shrimp in Tampa Bay. The research focused on Egmont Key and Old Tampa Bay and came to the several extremely interesting conclusions.

This article was originally published on Associated Content by Shadows on July 7th, 2007. It's brief and covers hand dip netting shrimp in the grass flats. In case you were wondering how it is done, here it is!

What do you use to protect your feet when you are walking the grass flats? Find out what you should be using here.

The attached report is an assessment of Florida Shrimp conducted by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission in 2006. It provides a lot of interesting information about shrimp in Florida, where they are caught, how many, etc.. It is worth a look over if you are interested in the species.

Recommendations about the best apparelt to be work while shrimping the grass flats. WHole ranges of improvements have occured over the years to make shrimping far more enjoyable. Look forward to this article being updated in the near future with new ideas for what to wear out on the shrimping trail!

Here are a few YouTube Video's of shrimpers using cast nets. We don't recommend it on the grass flats but if you are in an area where you can do it and want to try, here's how:

We talk about courtesy and etiquette when out on the water shrimping but one subject routinely goes unspoken. It isn't out of ignorance or our of a lack of concern but we here at Ozello Shrimpers take the issue very seriously and we want to make a point of mentioning it here today so that it stays in the front of your mind the next time you are out on the water.

Some swear by the moon phase. After thousands of years, the verdict is still out. We here at Ozello Shrimper take it into consideration though in our shrimping predictions and over the years have noticed a distinct correlation between the full and new moons and the shrimp yields during those phases. You'll find a selection of our favorite moon phse predictors here so you can track the shrimp as well as we do!

Here is a brochure developed by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Agency on how to respect the sea grass beds we use to catch our shrimp.

Yet another scientific study that highlights the migratory cycles and movement characteristics of our favorite bug. It also comes with an excellent map highlighting the primary shrimping grounds in South Florida as well as their nursery areas.

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